• Proper position of toothbrush against tooth What would happen if you stopped brushing your own teeth? Even if you only ate hard food as most dogs and many cats do, there still would be problems. You should be brushing your pet's teeth if you can manage it. It's not as difficult as you might imagine, and is extremely beneficial to your pet’s health and comfort. What are the benefits? Brushing[...]

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    Authored by: Becky Lundgren, DVM Puppies normally have 28 deciduous (baby) teeth that erupt during the first six months of life. Adult dogs have 42 permanent teeth. Kittens have 26 deciduous teeth, and adult cats have 30 teeth. The roots of the deciduous teeth resorb in order for the teeth to become loose and fall out. This allows the permanent teeth to erupt normally. When deciduous (baby)[...]

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    Figure 1 Bone and soft tissue loss associated with periodontal disease Dental disease is the number one disease in dogs and cats, 80% of dogs and 70% of cats have some level of periodontal disease by 2 years of age. It is a chronic, progressive disease, which gets worse in older pets. Small to medium breed dogs, sight hounds (Greyhounds, Whippets, Italian Greyhounds, etc.), and purebred cats [...]

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    (For more information or questions, contact Dr. Hewitt at 702.395.1800, or by e-mail at: dr.hewitt@cheyennewest.com) When a young pet has teeth that are missing, and has no history of losing the teeth by previous accident or extraction, then there are 2 possible causes. Either the adult teeth never developed in these areas, or the adult teeth developed, but never erupted into the mouth. [...]

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    (For more information or questions, contact Dr. Hewitt at 702.395.1800, or by e-mail at: dr.hewitt@cheyennewest.com) A malocclusion is the condition in which the positioning of the teeth is abnormal, causing them to occlude, or come in contact with each other, in an abnormal fashion. Some malocclusions are such that they result in damage being caused to either the soft tissues of the mouth,[...]

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    OVERVIEW (For more information or questions, contact Dr. Hewitt at 702.395.1800, or by e-mail at: dr.hewitt@cheyennewest.com) Introduction: Gingivostomatitis (also called stomatitis, lymphocytic-plasmacytic gingivostomatitis, or LPGS) is an inflammatory condition that can affect the gums, throat, and even the tongue of afflicted cats. The condition can develop at almost any age, and gets [...]

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    (For more information or questions, contact Dr. Hewitt at 702.395.1800, or by e-mail at: dr.hewitt@cheyennewest.com) Fractured upper 4th premolar and Fractured lower canine Dogs fracture (break) teeth in many ways. Fractured canine teeth (fangs) and incisors (small teeth in front of and between the fangs) usually result from either an impact with a solid object, from tugging behavior, or [...]

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    What is a feline tooth resorption lesion? TR lesion right lower 2nd premolar and X-ray of teeth One of the more common oral abnormalities seen in veterinary practice is the feline tooth resorption lesion (TR). Feline tooth resorption lesions have also been called cavities, caries, cervical neck lesions, external or internal root resorptions, and cervical line erosions. Other than external [...]

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    How common is dental disease in cats? Dental disease is one of the most common conditions seen by veterinarians. Approximately two-thirds of cats over three years of age have some degree of dental disease. The most common problems are due to periodontal disease, gingivostomatitis and tooth resorption lesions, also called cervical neck lesions. What are the clinical signs of dental disease?[...]

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    (For more information or questions, contact Dr. Hewitt at 702.395.1800, or by e-mail at: dr.hewitt@cheyennewest.com) Enamel hypoplasia is a condition where the hard outer layer (the enamel) of a tooth does not form properly. This usually affects multiple teeth when it is present. Tooth Anatomy: The tooth consists of 3 parts: enamel, dentin, and pulp. The enamel is the tough non-porous [...]

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    (For more information or questions, contact Dr. Hewitt at 702.395.1800, or by e-mail at: dr.hewitt@cheyennewest.com) Two different enamel defects Tooth Anatomy: The tooth consists of 3 parts: enamel, dentin, and pulp. The enamel is the tough non-porous outer coating of the tooth that is normally the only part of the tooth that can be seen. The dentin is a more porous bony material that lies[...]

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    (For more information or questions, contact Dr. Hewitt at 702.395.1800, or by e-mail at: dr.hewitt@cheyennewest.com) The normal structure of the tooth anatomy involves both the tooth itself, as well as the bone that it connects to. The tooth socket is called the alveolus, and the bone that surrounds the socket is the alveolar bone. The tooth and alveolus are connected to each other by the [...]

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    In the United States and Canada, only licensed veterinarians can practice veterinary medicine. Veterinary medicine includes veterinary surgery, medicine and dentistry. Anyone providing dental services other than a licensed veterinarian, or a supervised and trained veterinary technician, is practicing veterinary medicine without a license and is subject to criminal charges. This page addresses [...]

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    How can I help prevent tartar accumulation? Dogs and cats get plaque on their teeth just like we do! Plaque is made of proteins (from saliva) and bacteria. If the plaque is not removed every day, the bacteria will multiply rapidly and invade the gums around the teeth. Gingivitis, or inflammation of the gums, results. If the plaque is still not removed, minerals from the saliva combine with it to [...]

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    It is a relatively simple thing to do a “dental cleaning,” right? Wrong! In fact, a dental cleaning is as complex as any other procedure that requires general anesthesia. Here is a discussion of what is involved. Before the dental procedure: All dental procedures in animals require general anesthesia. Prior to any anesthetic procedure, pre-anesthetic blood tests must be performed to ensure[...]

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    BRUSHING YOUR CAT’S TEETH

    Teaching your cat to accept the brushing of its teeth will take some training, but will be very beneficial once he is accustomed to the process. Daily brushing is most beneficial and will help to establish a routine for your pet. Brushing two to three times a week is acceptable if your schedule can’t accommodate daily brushing. It is best to teach your cat to accept brushing while he or she [...]

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    Canine Dental Disease

    CANINE DENTISTRY I was unaware that dogs have dental problems. Is it common? Dental disease is the most common disease in dogs and cats. Over 80% of all pets over the age of three have some form of periodontal or dental disease. Most pets will show few signs of dental disease. It is up to the pet’s family and veterinarian to uncover this hidden and often painful condition. Are dental [...]

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    (For more information or questions, contact Dr. Hewitt at 702.395.1800, or by e-mail at: dr.hewitt@cheyennewest.com) PUPPY: When a pet is born, it has no visible teeth. Within a few weeks, the baby (deciduous) teeth erupt. During this time, the adult teeth are starting to develop in the bones of the upper and lower jaws. As these teeth develop, they start to erupt. As the adult teeth erupt, [...]

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